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Programs & Services

Programs and Services

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Leading from the Inside Out
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  • "This program is great and well facilitated. I hope that more healthcare leaders can have the opportunity to participate in this kind of program."
  • "This is a good program and especially helpful to have other participants in the same field of work."
  • "I thought Callie did a great job at providing opportunities for everyone in the group to open, honest and to share their valuable experiences with others."
  • "Working with the other leaders was the most rewarding – to hear other leaders and their struggles and together coming up with self-care strategies to better cope with work-life balance"
Guidelines & Regulations

Guidelines and Regulations

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WorkSafeBC’s healthcare and social services planned inspection initiative focuses on high-risk activities in the workplace that lead to serious injuries and time-loss claims.
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WorkSafeBC is releasing a discussion paper with proposed amendments to the Current Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual that guide wage rate decisions related to short-term and long-term disability compensation. Recommended amendments include: These changes may affect your claims costs. Click here to view the proposed changes and offer feedback to WorkSafeBC – The deadline is 4:30 p.m. on Friday, […]
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Toolkit

Safe Handling

Developing a Safe Handling program for your organization doesn’t have to be hard. It begins with five steps.

Safe handling toolkit in five (5) steps

Use this toolkit to help you assess Safe Handling in your workplace.

Creating a Safe Handling program begins with a conversation to better understand your organization’s overall safety culture. The culture of an organization plays a key part in any initiative. If you are looking to improve workplace health and safety at your organization, it’s very important to understand the state of your current workplace culture.

The Institute for Work & Health has a tool that will help you obtain a benchmark of your organization’s workplace safety culture. You can then use this survey to monitor perceived changes in your workplace’s safety culture as you implement changes. Make sure to capture a wide cross-section of staff when you survey for a more accurate picture.

Step 1: Assess your organization

Resources

The Institute for Work & Health has a tool that will help you obtain a benchmark of your organization’s workplace safety culture. You can then use this survey to monitor perceived changes in your workplace’s safety culture as you implement changes.
View Web link

Once you have determined your organization’s safety culture and risk of injury, you will want to gain the support of your leadership team.

Visible leadership support is a very important step when implementing your program. It demonstrates that the organization values safe handling. Demonstrating leadership support can be done by providing resources and communicating the importance of safe handling.

Watch this short video to learn more about how a care operator in Yarmouth committed to implementing a safe handling program and ended up with a significant culture shift in the organization’s overall occupational health and safety program.

Step 2: Obtain support from your leadership team

Resources

Watch this short video to learn more about how a care operator in Yarmouth committed to implementing a safe handling program and ended up with a significant culture shift in the organization’s overall occupational health and safety program.
View Video

Now that you’ve assessed the safety culture of your organization performed a risk assessment, and obtained the support of your leadership team, you’re ready to develop and implement a Safe Handling Policy. And the reasons why are obvious.

Studies have clearly demonstrated that injury rates among care workers can be significantly reduced by increasing the use of mechanical lifts and restricting manual client handling by care workers.

Developing a Safe Handling policy

The successful implementation of a safe handling policy requires a varied approach that is unique to each organization. However, there are some key principles that should be incorporated into any approach to ensure its effectiveness, including accessible and adequate handling equipment and a maintenance system for equipment. As such, this toolkit step encourages you to review your equipment to ensure that it meets the necessary requirements.

Resources to help you get started:

These resources were developed by SafeCare BC’s Technical Advisory Committee, which is comprised of union, WorkSafeBC, and employer representatives.

What’s Wrong with this Picture?

Print off these staged images, and have some fun with your team trying to identify the hazards.

Step 3: Create and implement a policy and program

Resources

Musculoskeletal injuries related to resident handling are the number one cause of injury in long term care. Back strains alone account for 30% of all work-related injuries reported; other strains account for 44%.
Files Attached
View Template
See how many hazards you can spot. Challenge your students, staff or co-workers. Take the picture to a safety committee or staff meeting - anywhere you can to generate discussion about the safety issues in the photo.
View Web link
This series of photos illustrates a care worker bathing a client. They show many hazards that may be encountered by a care worker while providing care in a client's bathroom. You can use these photos during safety meetings, or post them on the wall to encourage staff to spot the hazards.
View Web link

Training is an important step in your Safe Handling Program, as it provides frontline workers with the skills and information to help them perform their tasks more safely.

  • Train-the-Trainer Program
  • Safe Handling course
  • WorkSafeBC Training Resources
  • Point of Care Risk Assessments

Safe Handling Train-the-Trainer program

Like you, SafeCare BC is committed to helping reduce injury rates. SafeCare BC’s Safe Handling Train-the-Trainer workshop will give participants a comprehensive overview of the leading safe handling practices and techniques. In this two-day session, peer coaches will also learn coaching principles, giving them the tools and knowledge to successfully teach others about safe handling and musculoskeletal injury prevention. For more information on this program, please contact info@safecarebc.ca.

Safe Handling course

SafeCare BC’s Safe Handling course was specifically designed for continuing care workers and will provide participants with the leading practices to prevent injuries from overexertion while providing care. Those who would benefit most from the Safe Handling program are:

  • Care providers who provide direct care
  • Supervisors who work with those providing direct care and who would like to understand what safe work practices look like
  • Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee members who want to learn more about current and leading practices in safe handling.

Register for the Safe Handling course today if you want to stay safe at work and prevent common injuries! Please note: You must complete the self-paced online modules before your instructor-led session.

Request a Workshop ›

Training resources

WorkSafeBC has a collection of resources you can use as part of your in-house training program.

Point-of-care risk assessments

Point-of-care risk assessments are a key part of safe handling practices at the bedside. By doing this, the care provider can ensure that the resident or client’s ability matches the care plan.

  • Risk Assessment

For more information on the assessment, check out this short, interactive e-module developed by Interior Health and Northern Health that will help guide you on using the point-of-care risk assessment tool.

Step 4. Conduct training

Resources

A point of care risk assessment for transfers is a quick mini-appraisal you, the health care worker, do to make sure a person’s abilities still match what’s in their care plan. It doesn’t replace the typical risk assessment completed as part of a person’s care plan. Rather, it’s a tool you use in addition to the care plan assessments.
Files Attached
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Once you have created your safe handling program, evaluating the program is essential.

You can use the Safe Handling Program Checklist to verify the components of a safe handling program, including development, management and staff involvement, needs assessments, equipment, education and training, and evaluation. This will help you identify what aspects are working well and which may need more attention. The checklist should be completed regularly to ensure ongoing program quality improvement.

Step 5. Evaluate your program

Resources

You can use the Safe Handling Program Checklist to verify the components of a safe handling program, including development, management and staff involvement, needs assessments, equipment, education and training, and evaluation.
Files Attached
View Checklist
Safe Handling

Additional Resources

According to WorkSafeBC statistics, musculoskeletal injuries are the number one cause of staff injuries in BC’s continuing care sector. The economic cost of these injuries is easy to measure. It’s estimated that the cost of claims alone over the past five years is more than $85 million.
View Safety Topic
The Institute for Work & Health has a tool that will help you obtain a benchmark of your organization’s workplace safety culture. You can then use this survey to monitor perceived changes in your workplace’s safety culture as you implement changes.
View Web link
You can use the Safe Handling Program Checklist to verify the components of a safe handling program, including development, management and staff involvement, needs assessments, equipment, education and training, and evaluation.
Files Attached
View Checklist
Watch this short video to learn more about how a care operator in Yarmouth committed to implementing a safe handling program and ended up with a significant culture shift in the organization’s overall occupational health and safety program.
View Video
Musculoskeletal injuries related to resident handling are the number one cause of injury in long term care. Back strains alone account for 30% of all work-related injuries reported; other strains account for 44%.
Files Attached
View Template
See how many hazards you can spot. Challenge your students, staff or co-workers. Take the picture to a safety committee or staff meeting - anywhere you can to generate discussion about the safety issues in the photo.
View Web link
This series of photos illustrates a care worker bathing a client. They show many hazards that may be encountered by a care worker while providing care in a client's bathroom. You can use these photos during safety meetings, or post them on the wall to encourage staff to spot the hazards.
View Web link
Baptist Housing has 1,200 team members caring for 2,100 residents at 17 senior living communities across BC. Having an effective return to/recover at work program for injured workers is essential, not only for the workers themselves but also for their co-workers and the organization’s operations
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More Toolkits

COVID-19 introduces a new series of risks that change the way healthcare workers must work. We have created a new tool — a COVID-19-specific version of the Point of Care Assessment — to help you stay on top of your workplace safety. The Point of Care Assessment serves as an informal reminder, asking you to […]
Files Attached
View Toolkit
The hierarchy of controls details a specific order to follow when assessing and controlling risk.
Files Attached
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We strive to empower those working in the continuing care sector to create safer, healthier workplaces by fostering a culture of safety through evidence-based education, leadership, and collaboration.
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