SafeCare BC Logo
SafeCare BC Logo
Resources & Tools

Resources and Tools

View All
This risk assessment audit tool includes a template for long-term care, home care and community health support, and non-clinical areas.
Files Attached
View Risk Assessment Audit Tool
In long-term care it is increasingly apparent that who is on shift is just as important as how many staff are on shift. Quality care is difficult to achieve when we do not routinely engage with one another in a positive, or civil, manner.
View Toolkit
Programs & Services

Programs and Services

View All
Register
Leading from the Inside Out
Leading from the Inside Out waitlist
Guidelines & Regulations

Guidelines and Regulations

View All
WorkSafeBC’s healthcare and social services planned inspection initiative focuses on high-risk activities in the workplace that lead to serious injuries and time-loss claims.
View News Story
WorkSafeBC is releasing a discussion paper with proposed amendments to the Current Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual that guide wage rate decisions related to short-term and long-term disability compensation. Recommended amendments include: These changes may affect your claims costs. Click here to view the proposed changes and offer feedback to WorkSafeBC – The deadline is 4:30 p.m. on Friday, […]
View News Story
fEATURED tOPIC

Dementia Care

Dementia can affect behaviour and mood - but the care for persons with dementia aims to achieve the same goals - whether at home or in long-term care - safety for the person, family, and caregivers.

Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias | Understanding behaviours related to dementia – a guide for care workers

Understanding dementia

  • Dementia is an umbrella term with many subtypes, such as Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and frontal-temporal dementia. The most common type (64%) is Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Most dementia is non-reversible and progressive.
  • Each person’s journey is different.
  • Changes in the ability to function and think vary, depending on stage and type
  • Cognitive losses result in:
    • Impaired ability to learn, remember information and concentrate
    • Decreased ability to solve problems, make decisions and use good judgment
    • Increased difficulty communicating and reduced ability to care for self independently

Goals of care

Care for persons with dementia aims to achieve the same goals whether at home or in residential care:

  • Safety of the person, family and caregivers
  • Respect and dignity for the person
  • Maximum independence and ability to function
  • Optimal quality of life for the older adult, including freedom from anxiety, agitation, fear and
    loneliness

In the home, ensure a safe environment, create a routine that works for the older person, and facilitate rest and respite for family caregivers.

In long-term care, design the environment to make the most of quality of life (e.g., safe access to outdoor space); ensure that approaches to care are flexible and person-centred.

Complications of dementia

  • Dementia affects behaviour and mood. Many persons with dementia will develop Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD).
  • The nature of BPSD includes:
    • Symptoms such as anxiety, depression, agitation, reversed sleep patterns, hallucinations
    • Repetitive behaviours such as repeated questions, rocking, pacing, restlessness, crying, calling out, repeated communication or actions (e.g., tapping fingers)
    • Socially difficult behaviours such as screaming, resistance to care and verbal outbursts.
    • Behaviours arise from brain damage caused by dementia and can be triggered by unmet needs or the environment. Behaviours are seldom unpredictable.

A new way to understand behaviours

  • In dementia, all behaviour has meaning. When words are lost, communication becomes behavioural. Every behaviour has an underlying cause.
  • Behaviours are the older adult’s best attempt to cope with a confusing and threatening environment.
  • Words like “aggressive,” “disruptive,” “challenging,” “excessive,” and “resistive” are labels that have negative meanings and focus on the behaviour instead of the unmet need. Focus on the underlying cause of the behaviour.
  • Recognizing behaviours as “responsive” and “protective” helps guide care:
    • Responsive behaviours indicate an unmet need such as hunger, pain, thirst, need to void, boredom, sensory overload or fatigue.
    • Protective behaviours arise from the person’s need to protect themselves against feelings such as frustration, failure, embarrassment, confusion and fear.
  • The care team’s focus is to create an environment in each person’s best interests:
    • This environment includes physical surroundings that support the older adult’s limitations and enable them to continue using existing strengths.
    • The facility must also sustain a culture or philosophy of care that enables staff to adapt routines to individual needs.

Prevention is key: know the person

  • Responsive and protective behaviours can often be prevented by eliminating environmental stressors. Look for triggers and patterns. Build this knowledge into the individualized care plan.
  • Change the environment as needed. Changing the environment is easier than changing a person with dementia. For example, reduce noise or other stimulation, and provide a quiet space.
  • Learn about the person’s background, usual routine, personality, the name they prefer to be called, preferences, dislikes, strengths, fears, and what comforts them when distressed.

Communication approach

  • A person-centred philosophy of care includes a communication approach that aims to be positive, with a focus on connecting rather than correcting.
  • Always look friendly. Don’t rush or hurry care—it will take longer in the long run.
  • Use a positive tone of voice. Guide rather than control or tell. Distract rather than confront.
  • Don’t start sentences with “No” and “Don’t,” as this increases resistance. Never argue or scold.
  • Avoid “elderspeak” (e.g., “dear” or “honey”), the childish style of communication that some people use when speaking to older adults with dementia. This makes most people angry.
  • Simplify talk and use short sentences. Ask one question at a time and limit choices to ones the person can successfully make.
  • Use non-verbal language whenever possible (e.g., smiling, nodding, gesturing, cueing).
  • Avoid laughing near a person with dementia who is suspicious, paranoid or delusional—you may be misinterpreted as threatening, which could lead to a negative reaction.
  • Communication should enhance a person’s self-respect and decrease uncertainty and anxiety.
Dementia Care

Featured Resources

Dementia is an umbrella term with many subtypes such as Alzheimer’s disease, vasculardementia and frontal-temporal dementia. The most common type (64%) is Alzheimer’s disease.
Files Attached
View Infographic
Starting at $35
Are you caring for someone living with dementia? Do you lead a multidisciplinary team who support those living with dementia? Do you want to better understand the challenges of Alzheimer’s and how it can affect a someone? Do you want to learn ways you can better care for someone with the disease?
View Workshop Topic
Learn to describe how dementia can change a person’s brain and explain why the strategies shown in the video are effective.
Files Attached
View Safety Huddle
Learn how dementia affects behaviour and be able to apply strategies to responsive behaviours.
Files Attached
View Safety Huddle
Families and continuing care providers work together to provide good quality, person-centred care for people living with dementia – yet sometimes, this experience is marked by frustration or resistance on both sides. A new video produced by SafeCare BC and the Alzheimer Society of B.C. explores the challenges and successes of caring for people living […]
View News Story
Dementia Care

Videos

Teepa Snow is a dementia-care education specialist with a background in occupational therapy and over 30 years in clinical practice. This was a presentation held by WorkSafe BC on April 27, 2012, on approach and communication with someone with dementia. How to Approach and Communicate with someone who has Dementia part 1. This was a […]
View Video
Filter

Dementia Care resources

Gentle Persuasive Approaches Workshop
Menno Place - Abbotsford
June 21st @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
June 21st @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Menno Place, Abbotsford
View Workshop
Gentle Persuasive Approaches Workshop
Golden Life Management - Courtenay
May 2nd @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
View Workshop
Gentle Persuasive Approaches Workshop
Golden Life Management - Courtenay
May 1st @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
View Workshop
Gentle Persuasive Approaches Workshop
Menno Place - Abbotsford
April 15th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
View Workshop
WorkSafeBC’s healthcare and social services planned inspection initiative focuses on high-risk activities in the workplace that lead to serious injuries and time-loss claims.
View News Story
Provincial violence prevention curriculum Workshop
Menno Place - Abbotsford
November 15th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
November 15th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Menno Place, Abbotsford
View Workshop
Provincial violence prevention curriculum Workshop
Menno Place - Abbotsford
September 23rd @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
September 23rd @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Menno Place, Abbotsford
View Workshop
Gentle persuasive approaches Workshop
Eden Gardens - Nanaimo
September 16th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
September 16th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Eden Gardens, Nanaimo
View Workshop
Provincial Violence Prevention Curriculum Train the Trainer Workshop
Sidney All Care - Sidney
August 19th to 22nd @ 8:30am-4:30pm
Starting at $400
August 19th to 22nd @ 8:30am-4:30pm
Sidney All Care, Sidney
View Workshop
Provincial violence prevention curriculum Workshop
Menno Place - Abbotsford
July 12th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $110
July 12th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Menno Place, Abbotsford
View Workshop
Provincial Violence Prevention Curriculum Train the Trainer Workshop
Brandt's Creek Mews - Kelowna
May 1st @ 8:30am
Starting at $400
View Workshop
Provincial Violence Prevention Curriculum Workshop
Menno Place - Abbotsford
May 13th to 14th @ 8:30am-4:30pm
Starting at $35
View Workshop
Gentle persuasive approaches Workshop
Eden Gardens - Nanaimo
April 15th @ 8:30am to 4:30pm
Starting at $35
View Workshop
Provincial Violence Prevention Curriculum Train the Trainer Workshop
SafeCare BC Training Centre - Burnaby
April 22nd to 25th @ 8:30am-4:30pm
Starting at $400
Are you already familiar with violence prevention techniques, but want to share your knowledge and expertise with others at your workplace? Are you looking to train your staff in a cost-effective and efficient manner?
View Workshop
Use the point of care assessment template below to identify the risks in each of the four boxes that may have lead to the resident becomeing responsive.
Files Attached
View Resource
Working with clients or residents and their families is not always easy. You may not be able to control how others act, but you can control how you respond.
Files Attached
View Safety Huddle
Starting at $20
This online refresher will provide an opportunity to revisit the PVPC content and should take no longer than one hour to complete.
View E-Learning
Use the Point of Care Assessment template below to identify the risks in each of the four boxes that may have lead to the resident becoming responsive.
Files Attached
View Template
This is a tool for care workers to ensure that they are providing safe, person-directed care through a quick at-the-bedside assessment.
Files Attached
View Innovation
Health care workers sometimes find themselves in situations where their plans for providing care don't achieve the intended results. A "two is better than one" solution to the situation won't work if workers don’t understand why the care plan didn't work in the first place. This video shows how, without a planned approach, two-person care can put […]
View Video
A guide developed by WorkSafeBC to help health care workers balance their obligations to protect client privacy with the need to communicate information to reduce the risk of acts of violence or aggression towards health care workers. This guide is suitable for those working for non-public bodies, including most affiliate and private long term care facilities. This information is targeted to administrators, front-line supervisors, members of joint occupational health and safety committees, educators, and risk managers.
View Web link
This document concerns the requirements related to patient privacy and worker health and safety that are set out by the Workers Compensation Act and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.
View Web link
An in-depth study into the problems of aggression within five of British Columbia’s long-term care facilities. The study’s findings recommend that employers use a systems approach to develop prevention and risk management strategies to reduce incidence of aggression in the workplace.
View Web link
This web book provides a brief overview of dementia and the common causes of aggressive response behaviour, along with suggested interventions.
View Web link
This video series describes how to care for people with dementia. This video introduces the series and provides caregivers with general information on dementia.
View Web link
Continuing care workers experience violence frequently in the course of their work. Hear about the impact of workplace violence, and the need for caregivers to take care of themselves mentally, so they can take care of others.
View Video
Download and print your own Point of Care Assessment card. Share with your colleagues. We’ve made it easy with the Avery business card template.
Files Attached
View Template
Use these checklists to record information about worksite or department violence-related hazards and existing control measures.
Files Attached
View Task Analysis
Use this checklist to record information about client-centred violence-related hazards and existing control measures. The questions in the tool focus on common hazards and control measures. Organizations must evaluate client homes, surrounding areas and control measures for applicability. Use the table below as a reference tool when prioritizing action items.
Files Attached
View Environmental Survey
This document has been adapted from the Violence Risk Assessment Standard created by the Fraser Health Authority, Interior Health Authority, Northern Health Authority, Vancouver Coastal Health Authority, Vancouver Island Health Authority, First Nations Health Authority, the Provincial Health Services Authority and WorkSafeBC dated August 24, 2021. The purpose of this standard is to provide a […]
Files Attached
View Policy and Procedure Review
This risk assessment audit tool includes a template for long-term care, home care and community health support, and non-clinical areas.
Files Attached
View Risk Assessment Audit Tool
This is part of a violence risk assessment for your workplace. The information from this survey can be used for your violence prevention program improvement and evaluation.
Files Attached
View Staff Survey
This document provides an in-depth description of the steps involved in conducting a violence risk assessment.
Files Attached
View Resource Guide
Why should you do a violence risk assessment? Under what circumstances? Who should be involved? This Q & A document covers all the basics around violence risk assessments.
Files Attached
View Q&A
The Violence Risk Assessment Toolkit was created to help guide you through the process of conducting a violence risk assessment.
View Toolkit
This guide is intended to make employers aware of the parts of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation that prevention officers will be focusing on as part of the Health Care Planned Inspectional Initiative.
View Checklist
We continue offer our stop violence for display at your workplace. The sign is available in multiple languages. care homes across the province.
Files Attached
View Poster
The Violence Risk Assessment Toolkit was created to help guide you through the process of conducting a violence risk assessment. The risk assessment is a key part of an organization’s overall violence prevention program, a requirement under WorkSafeBC regulations.
View Toolkit
This quick reference guide give you a step-by-step overview on how to complete a violence risk assessment.
Files Attached
View Reference Guide
A point of care risk assessment for transfers is a quick mini-appraisal you, the health care worker, do to make sure a person’s abilities still match what’s in their care plan. It doesn’t replace the typical risk assessment completed as part of a person’s care plan. Rather, it’s a tool you use in addition to the care plan assessments.
Files Attached
View Poster
COVID-19 introduces a new series of risks that change the way healthcare workers must work. We have created a new tool — a COVID-19-specific version of the Point of Care Assessment — to help you stay on top of your workplace safety. The Point of Care Assessment serves as an informal reminder, asking you to […]
Files Attached
View Toolkit
Our low-tech safety idea is the creation of a ‘luggage tag’ style ID for a resident’s walker or wheelchair.
Files Attached
View Innovation
The patient identification band with colour coding is intended for every resident and acts as a helpful way to track and identify residents. For example, the red ID band represents residents who have Alzheimer's disease.
View Innovation
Violence refers to physical force that causes injury to a worker and includes any threatening statement or that gives you reasonable cause to believe that you are in danger.
View Safety Topic
Because of the unique requirements of the job, continuing care workers are susceptible to violent attacks more often than those in other occupations. Using the Point of Care Assessment can help reduce the risk of workplace violence
View Video
Working in continuing care can be like crossing the street – you might not always think about it, but there are risks and hazards to consider.
View Video
This video demonstrates some of the challenges of wearing PPE while supporting care recipients. Learn how a person living with dementia may interpret PPE and try our practical tips to help you connect and communicate.
View Video
In this video you will learn how dementia slows the thinking process and how you can adjust your approach to help improve communication. Our practical tips will help you use a person-centred approach with care recipients.
View Video
In this video you will learn how dementia can affect vision and what you can do to ensure you are seen. Our practical tips will help you interact with people living with dementia using a person-centred approach.
View Video
Use this template to develop a bullying and harassment policy for your organization.
Files Attached
View Template
SafeCare BC’s violence prevention policy templates will supplement existing policies of continuing care providers across the province and guide the establishment of new ones where none currently exists.
Files Attached
View Template
Learn to identify potentially violent situations, apply de-escalation techniques and report violence or near misses.
Files Attached
View Safety Huddle
Instructions Notes to the huddle leader Scenario
Files Attached
View Safety Huddle
Starting at $15
Employees who work alone or in isolation tend to be more vulnerable to safety hazards than those who have coworkers present.
View E-Learning
Starting at $15
In this course, you will learn about violence in the workplace including recognizing violence, calling for help, reporting incidents of violence, conducting a Point of Care Assessment and workers' right to refuse unsafe work.
View E-Learning
SafeCare BC is excited to partner with the Alzheimer Society of B.C. to bring you this 45-minute webinar. We will cover how dementia affects the brain and impacts communication and behaviour as the disease progresses. In this session, you will learn about: The difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia What to expect – the progression […]
View Webinar
SafeCare BC is excited to partner with the Alzheimer Society of BC to bring you this 45-minute webinar. We will cover the basics about behaviours common among people living with dementia and provide health-care providers with strategies to deliver person-centred care during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this session, you will learn about: How dementia affects […]
View Webinar
Starting at $50
The two modules that are being covered in these workshops are part of the curriculum, Dementia Capable Care of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Dementia; an evidence-based, nationally acclaimed training program created by the US NTG that has been modified by the NTG Canadian Consortium for the Canadian context.
View Workshop Topic
Starting at $400
Are you already familiar with violence prevention techniques, but want to share your knowledge and expertise with others at your workplace? Are you looking to train your staff in a cost-effective and efficient manner?
View Workshop Topic
Starting at $35
Are you a care worker that faces the risk of violence during your work day? Do you have the tools and training needed to de-escalate unpredictable and potentially dangerous situations?
View Workshop Topic
Working closely with clients and their families and friends, often under difficult circumstances and sometimes in isolated locations, can put you at risk of violence. Violence and aggressive behaviour are not part of your job.
View Safety Topic
SafeCare BC is excited to partner with the Alzheimer Society of BC to bring you this 45-minute webinar. We will explore how building successful relationships between people living with dementia, their families and continuing care providers is an important way to deliver good quality, person-centred care. In this session, you will learn about: The experiences […]
View Webinar
The National Alliance for Safety and Health in Healthcare applauds House of Commons Standing Committee on Health for recommendations to address violence facing healthcare workers
View News Story
The Violence Risk Assessment was created to help guide you through the process of conducting a violence risk assessment. The Risk Assessment is a key part of an organization’s overall violence prevention program, a requirement under WorkSafeBC regulations.
View Video
As part of our violence prevention campaign, we interviewed Kyla Tinham, HR Coordinator, Health and Safety at Strive Living, about how acts of violence affect her workplace and why violence prevention is so important.
View News Story
Due to the potential for psychological and physical trauma to residents and staff, these incidents flag risks that need to be addressed to ensure the safety and well-being of residents, particularly those with dementia and staff.
View News Story
To satisfy this growing demand for dementia education, SafeCare BC, in cooperation with AGE Inc., recently piloted coach training for Gentle Persuasive Approaches (GPA) for SafeCare BC members.
View News Story
Advanced Gerontological Education (AGE) Inc. and SafeCare BC are pleased to announce their partnership to make the Gentle Persuasive Approach (GPA) curriculum available to continuing care workers across BC.
View News Story
SafeCare BC Logo
©2024 SafeCare BC | All rights reserved.
We strive to empower those working in the continuing care sector to create safer, healthier workplaces by fostering a culture of safety through evidence-based education, leadership, and collaboration.
crosschevron-down