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Guidelines & Regulations

Guidelines and Regulations

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WorkSafeBC’s healthcare and social services planned inspection initiative focuses on high-risk activities in the workplace that lead to serious injuries and time-loss claims.
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WorkSafeBC is releasing a discussion paper with proposed amendments to the Current Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual that guide wage rate decisions related to short-term and long-term disability compensation. Recommended amendments include: These changes may affect your claims costs. Click here to view the proposed changes and offer feedback to WorkSafeBC – The deadline is 4:30 p.m. on Friday, […]
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Q&A

Violence Risk Assessment Q&A

Why should you do a violence risk assessment? Under what circumstances? Who should be involved? This Q & A document covers all the basics around violence risk assessments.

A violence risk assessment is a process used to determine the risk of violence present in a workplace and provides information on what actions should be taken to eliminate or minimize the level of risk for workers.

A violence risk assessment is a component of the violence prevention program. The violence
prevention program includes a written policy, regular risk assessments, prevention procedures, training requirements, a process for reporting and investigating violent incidents, incident follow-up, and program review. The results of a risk assessment should determine the nature and extent of the violence prevention program that is required.

A violence risk assessment is part of an organization’s violence prevention program, which WorkSafeBC regulations require in any workplace where there is a risk of injury to workers from violence as a result of their employment.

The violence risk assessment should be completed by a manager or representative with the help of both union and non-union members of the joint occupational health and safety committee. If there is no such committee on site, the health and safety representative should provide that support instead. Subject matter experts, protection or security representatives, or the director of care and facility managers may also be involved when appropriate.

Yes, all workers have a role in the completion of a violence risk assessment by identifying and communicating risks to their supervisor or a member of the violence risk assessment team or joint occupational health and safety committee (or the worker health and safety representative where applicable).

A violence risk assessment should be completed in any workplace where workers are at risk of injury from violence arising out of their employment.

A violence risk assessment should be completed when:

  • an organization begins operations
  • a violence risk assessment has not previously been completed
  • there is a significant change in the nature of the work performed (e.g. new work tasks, changes to
    client/resident population or profile)
  • there is a significant change to the location of the workplace or department
  • when a Risk Assessment Audit Tool is completed and indicates a full violence risk assessment
    must be performed
  • three years has passed since the last violence risk assessment was completed.

Possibly. A violence risk assessment should be redone when:
• there is a significant change in the nature of the work (e.g. new work tasks, changes to
client/resident population or profile)
• there is a significant change to the location of the workplace or department
• when a Risk Assessment Audit Tool is completed and indicates a full violence review
assessment must be performed
• three years has passed since the last violence risk assessment was completed.

The SafeCare BC Violence Risk Assessment Process outlines six steps for completing a violence risk
assessment.

  1. Action items and timelines should be established.
  2. Updates should be provided to the joint occupational health and safety committee.
  3. If risks have been identified, steps must be taken to minimize and, when possible, eliminate them.
  4. Preventative procedures should be written and posted to inform workers.
  5. When training for workers is necessary, it should be provided.
  6. Monitor and update the violence risk assessment as required.

Those who are responsible for leading the violence risk assessment process should have a good
understanding of all relevant OHS regulations and policies. In-class courses, webinars, and podcasts
are available though SafeCare BC and these Education and Training Providers.

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Violence Risk Assessment Q&A

Related Resources

The Violence Risk Assessment Toolkit was created to help guide you through the process of conducting a violence risk assessment.
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More Q&As

The standard is a document that outlines a systematic approach to develop and sustain a psychologically healthy and safe workplace. It focuses on mental illness prevention and mental health promotion. The Standard is intended for everyone, whether or not they have a mental illness. The National Standard of Canada
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Why should you do a violence risk assessment? Under what circumstances? Who should be involved? This Q & A document covers all the basics around violence risk assessments.
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